Last edited by Kesida
Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

2 edition of Nuclear Pakistan and nuclear India found in the catalog.

Nuclear Pakistan and nuclear India

George H. Quester

Nuclear Pakistan and nuclear India

stable deterrent or proliferation challenge?

by George H. Quester

  • 244 Want to read
  • 9 Currently reading

Published by Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College in [Carlisle Barracks, Pa.] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Pakistan,
  • India,
  • Pakistan.,
  • India.
    • Subjects:
    • Nuclear weapons -- Pakistan.,
    • Nuclear weapons -- India.,
    • Nuclear nonproliferation.,
    • Pakistan -- Strategic aspects.,
    • India -- Strategic aspects.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementGeorge H. Quester.
      ContributionsArmy War College (U.S.). Strategic Studies Institute.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsUA853.P3 Q47 1992
      The Physical Object
      Paginationiv, 22 p. ;
      Number of Pages22
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1156521M
      LC Control Number94133139
      OCLC/WorldCa27211339

        When India went for its nuclear tests in May , Pakistan was already a nuclear weapons state. The tests enabled India to only establish strategic parity with Pakistan in the area of . In this important book, Indian strategic analyst Verghese Koithara explains and evaluates India’s nuclear force management, encouraging a broad public conversation that may act as a catalyst for Author: Verghese Koithara.

      Pakistan 's Nuclear Doctrine P roponents of Pakistan 's nuclear doctrine point the following backdrop which should form the basis of enunciating the official Pakistani Nuclear Doctrine: 1. Pakistan 's nuclear arsenal is India specific and designed to off-set India 's conventional and nuclear weapons superiority. 2.   The story of Pakistan's quest for nuclear weapons and the country's involvement in its unprecedented selling of nuclear weapons designs to Iran, Libya and North Korea are carefully documented by Professor Hassan Abbas of the National Defence University in Washington DC, in his book Pakistan's Nuclear Bomb: A Story of Defiance, Deterrence and Deviance.

        NEW DELHI: Pakistan may have had a nuclear bomb well before it was thought to have until now. Pakistan’s nuclear scientist and father of the bomb A .   India’s Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) had come to power in the elections with a platform promising to be “openly nuclear” and challenge Pakistan’s control of parts of Kashmir. After the Indian detonations, American diplomats attempted to dissuade Pakistan, led by Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, from following suit.


Share this book
You might also like
In defense of globalization

In defense of globalization

Practical Studies for Flute, Book II

Practical Studies for Flute, Book II

National 36th Congress

National 36th Congress

Bruce Covilles Book of Monsters

Bruce Covilles Book of Monsters

The Criminal Justice System

The Criminal Justice System

The Northeast Oregon assembled land exchange (NOALE) and final environmental impact statement

The Northeast Oregon assembled land exchange (NOALE) and final environmental impact statement

Art of Horror Stories

Art of Horror Stories

Encouragement for the Day Hardcover Memo Pad

Encouragement for the Day Hardcover Memo Pad

The Biologists Handbook of Pronunciations

The Biologists Handbook of Pronunciations

Furniture retailers

Furniture retailers

Job specifications (specialist grades)

Job specifications (specialist grades)

Improving citizenship education

Improving citizenship education

Spanish surname recent migrant families

Spanish surname recent migrant families

Lloyds Bank in the history of English banking.

Lloyds Bank in the history of English banking.

Nuclear Pakistan and nuclear India by George H. Quester Download PDF EPUB FB2

This book’s perspectives on nuclear weapons and Pakistan provide a timely addition to the discourse. Air Commodore Jasjit Singh was a prolific and Location: Kasturi Building, Anna Salai,Mount Road, Chennai,Tamil Nadu. The documents in the briefing book date from to InIndia had an advanced civilian nuclear program, while Pakistan's was in its early stages.

Innine years had elapsed since India's explosion of a nuclear device, and Pakistan's nuclear weapons program was well under way. It looks at the prospects for nuclear arms control and disarmament in South Asia after the U.S.-India nuclear deal ofand the nuclear abolitionist wave during the first Obama administration.

It concludes with the contribution of social constructivism to understanding how changes in the India-Pakistan nuclear status quo can happen. The Americans, though, could possess the ability to remotely disable an aircraft supplied to Pakistan, if it embarks on a mission carrying nuclear weapons.

Hoodbhoy in his book Confronting the Bomb stressed on the threat to Pakistan’s nuclear arsenal is from within its army, where insiders in collusion with external Islamic groups could be.

"George Perkovich's book is one I wish I had written. India's Nuclear Bomb appears at a critical moment in global nuclear history, and it will have an important impact on the current policy debate in the United States, India, and Pakistan, as well as on the future histories of /5(6).

India and Nuclear Asia will fill that gap in our knowledge by focusing on the post evolution of Indian nuclear thought, its arsenal, the triangular rivalry with Pakistan and China, and New Delhi's nonproliferation policy approaches.

Yogesh Joshi and Frank O'Donnell show how India's nuclear trajectory has evolved in response to domestic. "Feroz Hassan Khan's book Eating Grass: The Making of the Pakistani Bomb is a comprehensive description of Pakistan's campaign to develop its nuclear weapons Eating Grass is in a class by itself because it is written by an author who served as director of arms control and disarmament affairs in the Strategic Plans Division of the Joint Cited by:   Among the nine nuclear weapon-capable nations (US, Russia, France, UK and China; India and Pakistan; North Korea and an opaque Israel), it.

In particular, the book is a scathing indictment of the Chinese government, alleging that it intentionally proliferated nuclear technology to risky regimes, particularly Pakistan.

Reed recently Author: Alex Kingsbury. Pakistan made it clear since early that if India staged a nuclear test, it had done the basic development work and would immediately start assembling its own nuclear explosive device.

Its nuclear weapons capability has since been demonstrated, and it is assumed to have enough highly-enriched uranium for up to 40 nuclear warheads. Looking back, the nuclear tests by India and Pakistan and the subsequent rejection by the Senate of the CTBT were significant setbacks for global nonproliferation efforts.

Nonetheless, the sky has not fallen. In the following decade, only one additional device has been tested, the lowest number in any year period since the bomb's unveiling. As ofnuclear power in Pakistan is provided by 5 commercial nuclear power plants.

Pakistan is the first Muslim country in the world to construct and operate civil nuclear power plants. The Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC), the scientific and nuclear governmental agency, is solely responsible for operating these power plants.

As ofthe electricity generated by commercial. Nuclear-equipped India and Pakistan are involved in a confrontation over the disputed region of Kashmir.

Malik added: “You are a Unicef ambassador. Pakistan’s nuclear arsenal is widely regarded as designed to dissuade India from taking military action against Pakistan, but Islamabad’s expansion of its nuclear arsenal, development of new types of nuclear weapons, and adoption of a doctrine called “full spectrum deterrence” have ledFile Size: KB.

A test of India’s long-range, nuclear-capable missile in India is said to be considering allowing for pre-emptive nuclear strikes against Pakistan in the event of a war. @article{osti_, title = {Nuclear programs in India and Pakistan}, author = {Mian, Zia}, abstractNote = {India and Pakistan launched their respective nuclear programs in the s and s with considerable foreign technical support, especially from the United States Atoms for Peace Program.

The technology and training that was acquired served as the platform for later nuclear weapon Author: Mian, Zia. Pakistan's nuclear evolution: A primer. By Moeed Yusuf. Exactly two decades ago this day, Pakistan tested nuclear weapons following India’s lead, becoming the seventh country to declare its nuclear capability to the world.

As the street erupted in jubilation, Pakistani officials talked up the benefits of the country’s newly earned status.

This book provides a comprehensive account of the mysterious story of Pakistan's attempt to develop nuclear weapons in the face of severe odds. Hassan Abbas profiles the politicians and scientists involved, and the role of China and Saudi Arabia in supporting Pakistan's nuclear infrastructure.

Abbas also unravels the motivations behind the Pakistani nuclear physicist Dr A.Q. "George Perkovich's book is one I wish I had written. India's Nuclear Bomb appears at a critical moment in global nuclear history, and it will have an important impact on the current policy debate in the United States, India, and Pakistan, as well as on the future histories of Indian politics and international security policy.".

This book provides a comprehensive account of the mysterious story of Pakistan’s attempt to develop nuclear weapons in the face of severe odds. Hassan Abbas profiles the politicians and scientists involved, and the role of China and Saudi Arabia in supporting Pakistan’s nuclear infrastructure.

Pakistanis with the most knowledge of the country’s nuclear program are among the most worried. On Dec. 16,the Taliban launched a deadly Author: Rahmatullah Nabil.

NEW DELHI: A nuclear war between India and Pakistan could, in less than a week, kill million people -- more than the death toll during all six years of World War II, and lead to global climate catastrophe, according to researchers in the US.

A study by researchers from the University of Colorado Boulder and Rutgers University examined how such a hypothetical future conflict would have.Nuclear proliferation, a security issue which has transcended the cold war, has been, and is, particularly troublesome in South Asia. There, India and Pakistan, neighbors with unresolved disputes since they were granted independence at the end of World War II, are believed to have nuclear weapons (although the leaders of both nations deny it) and are intermittently engaged in conflict with.